Deadly strikes

I was reading the CNN article on the deadly Greek strikes when I came across the following comment by another reader: “Maybe the Greek protesters don’t want to bail out their own “Wall Street” the way the Middle Class was forced into doing in the US. If that’s the case, then GOOD FOR THEM!” Even though the commentator is correct on the intention of the public in Greece, how is it possible that something as noble as the value of maintaining a strong political identity got degraded to a violent killing spree?

A person resorting to extreme expressions of violence is someone deprived of things vital to his/her existence, desolate and desperate. I believe this is the case all around the world. We have been witnessing so many new kinds of violence eruptions of violence this last decade; 9/11, school shootings, hotel shootings in India, bus bombings in London and the list goes on. Why are modern citizens becoming vessels of death, destruction and sorrow? Civilization should be turning us more civil, polite-r to each other, not urging us to kill each other.

Here is another comment from a different poster on the CNN website: “Banks and the Government keep stealing from them, so who wouldn´t expect this. It´s nice to see some people in Europe actually stand up against tyranny.”Is it true that Governments and Banks steal from the public? How is stealing defined in that sense? Misrepresenting tax spending, on the part of the government, and deliberately guiding customers to take on loans they will never be able to repay, on the part of the banks, could be what causes people to feel that desperate. It is as though the rules of modern civilization connive and manipulate citizens into the wrong financial, health and life choices only to turn them to desperate beings capable of resorting to extreme violence.

Developed countries are suffering a modern kind of violence: violence as a response to modern day financial realities. Violence springs as a direct response to the inequalities in increasingly capitalistic societies.


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